Posted in CPR
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Saturday, 30 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

Infant CPR/AED – HCP Level

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The following blog on Infant CPR at an HCP level is for information purposes only. If you want to learn to do CPR or CPR HCP take a CPR course with Vancouver First Aid Ltd.

The following is the steps for Infant CPR/AED at an HCP level.

1. Scene Assessment. Check the scene for hazards and mechanisms of injury.

2. Apply personal protection – Apply gloves and mask if available

3. Assess the levels of consciousness (AVPU)

4. Open the Airway – Open the airway using a head tilt / chin or jaw thrust.

5. Breathing – Check for normal breathing for 5 seconds.

6. Circulation – Using the carotid artery, check for circulation for 10 seconds.

7. Activate EMS and have the AED brought to the scene.

8. Start CPR – 30:2 compression to breath ratio for 1 rescuer. 15:2 compression to breath ratio for 2 rescuers.

9. AED – Begin AED protocol as soon as it arrives on scene

10. Position AED electrode pads on victim and connect to AED (follow prompts)

11. Analyze, follow prompts, and shock if advised.

12. ABC reassessment – pulse present but not breathing effectively

13. Rapid Body Survey – survey body for bleeding, fractures and medical alerts (ex: bracelets)

14. ABC reassessment every 2 minutes.

To learn Infant CPR at an HCP level take CPR HCP with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. The list provided includes Infant HCP CPR procedures at 2011 Lifesaving Society Standards. These are the most up to date standards provided (includes Red Cross and Heart and Stroke Foundation who have yet to update there standards to this level). For Private HCP courses use our contact us page or call 778-709.9180.

Posted in CPR, First Aid, Questions
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Friday, 29 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

Difference Between Red Cross Childcare, Emergency and Standard First Aid

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This page is designed to help candidates understand the difference between the three major Red Cross first aid programs which include emergency first aid, standard first aid and childcare first aid. These courses have a number of similarities however they do have a significant number of differences. This page outlines the course content of all three of these courses.

Childcare First Aid

Course Length: 8 hours

Material: Childcare First Aid Manual

CPR: CPR Level B (Adult and Child)

Topics Covered:

  • Introduction
  • The Red Cross
  • Preparing to Respond
  • The EMS System
  • Check, Call, Care
  • Airway Emergencies
  • Breathing and Circulation Emergencies
  • First Aid for Respiratory and Cardiac Arrest
  • Head and Spine Injuries
  • Bone, Muscle, and Joint Injuries
  • Wound Care
  • Sudden Medical Conditions
  • Environmental Emergencies
  • Poisons
  • Keeping Children Safe

Certificate: Red Cross Childcare First Aid Certification includes CPR B and AED (Valid for 3 years)

Emergency First Aid

Course Length: 8 hours

Material: Red Cross First Aid and CPR Manual

CPR: CPR Level A (Adult Only) (CPR C available upon request)

Topics Covered:

  • Introduction
  • The Red Cross
  • Preparing to Respond
  • The EMS System
  • Check, Call, Care
  • Airway Emergencies
  • Breathing & Circulation Emergencies
  • First Aid for Respiratory & Cardiac Arrest

Certificate: Red Cross Emergency First Aid Certificate includes CPR A and AED (Valid for 3 years)

Standard First Aid

Course Length: 16 to 18 hours

Course Material: Red Cross First Aid and CPR Manual

CPR: CPR Level C (CPR HCP available upon request) (Adult, Child and Infant)

Topics Covered:

  • Introduction
  • The Red Cross
  • Preparing to Respond
  • The EMS System
  • Check, Call, Care
  • Airway Emergencies
  • Breathing & Circulation Emergencies
  • First Aid for Respiratory & Cardiac Arrest
  • Head & Spine Injuries
  • Bone, Muscle & Joint Injuries
  • Wound Care
  • Sudden Medical Emergencies
  • Environmental Emergencies

Certificate: Red Cross Standard First Aid Certificate includes CPR C and AED (Valid for 3 years)


Posted in Wilderness
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Thursday, 28 July 2011
Last updated: April 24, 2012 at 23:49 pm

Vancouver First Aid Updates.

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Vancouver First Aid Ltd will be updating its page to include the following locations:

  • Britannia
  • Yaletown
  • East Vancouver

The pages will have the following URL’s:

  • http://vancouverfirstaid.ca/about/locations/Britannia
  • http://vancouverfirstaid.ca/about/locations/Yaletown
  • http://vancouverfirstaid.ca/about/locations/EastVancouver

The pages will include information about the courses offered which will be updated by Mark. The pages will also include the address of the location (in bold), types of first aid and CPR courses offered, and a google map of the location inbedded in the page. Places pages will be created for each of these locations.

Possible Further Expansion within two months:

  • UBC
  • http://vancouverfirstaid.ca/about/locations/UBC
  • Point Grey
  • http://vancouverfirstaid.ca/about/locations/PointGrey

Both these courses will meet the previously mentioned criteria of what will be placed on the pages.

Special Thanks to Eric Quan for his updates.

Posted in CPR, First Aid
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Monday, 25 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

Upcoming First Aid and CPR Courses in the Lower Mainland

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Vancouver First Aid promises to provide the most reliable, cheapest and entertaining first aid and cpr courses in the lower mainland. Our policy is to provide convenient, comfortable, safe and welcoming courses to the lower mainland.  The following are the upcoming first aid and CPR courses at re-certifications at Vancouver First Aid Ltd.  We will be expanding and including courses in Downtown Vancouver (Yaletown), West Vancouver, Richmond,  Burnaby and Surrey.

Full First Aid and CPR Courses in Vancouver

  • Sept 3
  • Sept 17
  • Oct 1
  • Oct 15
  • Oct 29
  • Nov 12
  • Nov 26
  • Dec 10

Recert Days

  • Sept 10
  • Sept 24
  • Oct 8
  • Oct 22
  • Nov 5
  • Nov 19
  • Dec 3
  • Dec 17

Britannia Recerts
WSI / Possibly NLS recerts / First Aid and CPR recerts
*Britannia Pool will be closed until October.

  • Oct 31
  • Nov 27
  • Dec 10

All courses are subject to change, however, we maintain the policy of never cancelling our courses and providing the cheapest first aid courses and recertifications in the lower mainland. To register for a course select your desired course from the side menu bar or from the dropdown menu bar at the top of the page.  If you would like to have a private course, with a minimum of 3 candidates, please contact us via our contact us page
or call at 778-709-9180.

Posted in CPR, First Aid
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Monday, 18 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

New Locations for Vancouver First Aid Ltd.

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Vancouver First Aid Ltd is proud to offer courses, renewals and recertifications in first aid and CPR in several new locations this year. We will continue to provide first aid courses in Vancouver at our main locations and we are adding two new locations. Britannia community centre will be hosting CPR and First Aid recertifications every two weeks via Vancouver First Aid Ltd. We will also be proudly offering courses in Downtown Vancouver at the English as a Second Language School in Yaletown. Courses at Britannia will begin in July and courses at the English as a Second Language school will begin in Fall. For more information and for registration please view our main page and check out all our upcoming recertifications / renewals and full first aid and CPR courses.

Posted in CPR
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Monday, 11 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

CPR Compression for an Adult.

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The information posted in this blog on CPR for adults is for information purposes only. If you want to learn to do new CPR techniques take a CPR class with Vancouver First Aid Ltd.

Chest compression’s on adults has changed considerably in the last decade. The Lifesaving Society, Red Cross and Heart and Stroke Foundation receive there guidance from ILCOR which provides all the latest statistics and information on CPR.  With the information provided by ILCOR, all the major providers change there CPR standards every few years. Within the past 10 years, CPR landmarking or compression standards have changed at least 3 times.  All the major CPR providers put a lot of emphasis on changing there methods to keep CPR as simple and efficient as possible.

Ten years ago, land marking for chest compression’s was done by following the victims rib cage up to the xiphoid process (the little process below your sternum) and land marking two inches above that.  This land-marking method was the most complicated in the past ten years. With a victim being significantly overweight and wearing several articles of clothing, finding the xiphoid, was at times, difficult. For every minute going by without proper chest compression’s, the victims chances of recovery reduces drastically. Using a method of land marking that can be confusing and easy to miss reduces recovery rates and therefore was quickly removed as the land marking method for chest compression’s.

The method of land-marking for chest compression’s changed from using the xiphoid process to using a much easier method of land-marking. Following the xiphoid process method was using the victim’s armpit and moving towards the centre of the chest from there. In this method the rescuer would go up the victims body with there arm up into there armpit and move to the centre of the chest from there. This method is dramatically easier and significantly faster than the previous method. However, with the heart being only the size of your fist there isn’t much room for error. Using this armpit method was not as accurate, especially as the victim was larger in size and wearing more articles of clothing. This method lasted for several years until the method of land-marking changed again.

With the introduction of AED’s, rescuers were being told that they had to prepare there victims for an AED (automated external defibrillator). This meant that rescuers needed to expose the chest of the victim because the placement of an AED could only be on a bare chest. This meant that land-marking could now be accomplished using a visual land-marking system. Rescuers were now being told to land-mark between the victims nipples. This method proved to be the easiest and quickest method of land-marking. This improved the success rates of CPR as rescuers were became more confident with this easy method of landmarking and rescuers were becoming quicker.

Unfortunately, CPR land-marking for adults has changed again. The method of “between the nipples” was changed to the center of the chest. Rescuers are still required to expose the victims chest, however, they are required to land-mark at the center of the chest, instead of between the nipples. Land-marking changed to this method because, especially as victims got older, the nipples moved away from the center of the chest. This gave the possibility of rescuers doing chest compression’s on the wrong location. This slight change to land-marking on the center of the chest decreased the possibility of doing chest compression’s on the wrong location of the chest.

CPR will continue to change and rescuers need to embrace these changes as they increase the efficiency of chest compression’s and increase chances of recovery. If you want to learn to do Red Cross CPR take a first aid class with Vancouver First Aid Ltd.

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Wednesday, 06 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

What to wear when taking a CPR or First Aid course?

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A frequently asked question when people take a first aid or CPR course is: what should i wear? As a first aid instructor I have seen people coming in wearing stilettos, high heel boots and mini skirts. However, when taking a first aid course you are going to need to move around quickly and be very comfortable. CPR, when performed properly, needs to be done on a firm and flat surface. This means that when doing CPR, the rescuer will most likely be kneeling on the floor. Furthermore, you are going to be coming up and down from the floor several times making it somewhat uncomfortable in mini skirts or high heels.

I highly recommend that you wear comfortable clothes and clothes that you won’t worry about kneeling with. Runners or comfortable shoes are also important. Its unsafe to be running around in high heels trying to stay calm in a mock panic scenario. Shorts, jogging pants, runners and a comfortable top work great. No need to wear formal attire. First aid courses aren’t formal events. So be comfy, sit back and enjoy the show. Register for a first aid class in Vancouver today.

Posted in CPR, CPR Questions
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Monday, 04 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

How to prevent infants from Choking.

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The information posted in this blog is for information purposes only. If you wish to learn to treat and recognize first aid emergencies register for a first aid course in Vancouver with Vancouver First Aid Ltd.

The highest method of accidental deaths for infants in North America is via choking. Fortunately, there are two easy ways to prevent infants from choking. One simple method is prevention. I have spoken to an anesthesiologist from a local children’s hospital and he explained to me that infants and young children will choke on EVERYTHING! He has been part of surgical teams removing everything from batteries, lego’s, coins and candy’s from the passage ways of you children and infants.  If they can put in in there mouth they can choke on it. The simplest way to prevent any choking is to prevent it from happening. As they get older, sausages and grapes are the most likely culprits of causing young children, and adults to choke. Cut the grapes in half or in quarters and cut up the hot dog sausages before feeding them to the children. Use common sense around the babies crib, kitchen and with everything they eat. The best way to stop your infant or child from choking is to prevent it from every happening.

Another method of preventing your child or infant from becoming a fatal statistic from choking is by learning CPR. CPR teaches people straight forward and simple methods of rescuing choking victims. Combinations of abdominal thrusts and back blows have a very high statistic of removing a choking obstruction and saving an Adult, infant or Child. Take a CPR course in Vancouver today and learn to save the life of a loved one.

Vancouver First Aid Ltd offers CPR and first aid courses throughout BC in comfortable classrooms in no-pressure and fun environments. We offer the cheapest courses at the most convenient locations. All courses are affiliated with either the Red Cross or the Lifesaving Society.  Register for a course today.

Posted in CPR
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Friday, 01 July 2011
Last updated: July 13, 2014 at 16:33 pm

Infant CPR: Tips and Training for 2005 and 2010 standards.

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The information posted in this blog on infant CPR is for information purposes only. If you want to learn to do infant CPR take a Red Cross CPR course or a Infant CPR course with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. Infant CPR training is included in CPR “C”, CPR “HCP” and infant first aid courses.

Adult and child CPR have become more and more similar to infant CPR. Over the past decade several changes have been implemented by the Red Cross, Lifesaving Society and other first aid and CPR providers that have made the differences between all adult, child and infant CPR very small. This blog post will focus on infant CPR and the subtle differences between it and adult CPR.

When surveying the scene and doing a scene assessment for an adult, the rescuer pinches and shouts to determine the responsiveness of the victim. Rescuers are required to gently pinch the neck muscles to determine the responsiveness of deaf victims. For victim responsiveness with infants, we can not pinch the neck of the infant becomes it doesn’t have the muscle to gently pinch. Instead, the rescuers can tickle the toes and gently move the legs and arms to determine responsiveness. Shouting also applies for infants to determine responsiveness.

Furthermore, when opening the airway of an adult or child rescuers are told to pull the head back as far as possible with harming the victim (don’t pull back as hard as physically possible). However, for an infant, rescuers need to imagine the airway of an infant as a straw. If you pull the straw back too far, it bends and closes and prevents no air from passing through. If the rescuers doesn’t have the airway far back enough, just like with a straw, the airways remains closed. The rescuer needs to find the correct position to have an open airway for an infant. Instructors generally mention a “sniffing” position, however, most candidates, whether re-certifying or taking the course for the first time, have a glazed and dumbfounded look in there eyes when told about a “sniffing” position. The most easily understood explanation for opening an airway for an infant has been for the rescuer to tilt the head back of the infant so that the chin and the nose are parallel to the ground. This is the simplest and common sense tip for how to open the airway for an infant.

When ventilating an infant victim the rescuer can not plug the nose and ventilate as it is done for an adult or child. If a rescuer attempts to ventilate a infant victim by plugging the nose the rescuer will not be able to provide a good seal around the victims mouth and the ventilation will not be effective. Instead, when doing ventilation’s for an infant, the rescuer should seal his or her lips over the victims mouth and nose. This will create an effective seal and provide for effective ventilation’s for the infant.

When ventilating the infant, rescuer must be careful not to apply the same amount of air as for a adult or child victim. Too much air can cause stomach distension and create further complications and prevent effective CPR.  This is an occasion where too much can be a bad thing. As is the same for an adult and child victims, rescuers should attempt to watch the victims chest to see it rise as rescuers attempt to ventilate. Once the chest rises immediately stop and proceed to the next step whether it is to ventilate again or to perform chest compressions. When ventilating for an infant, rescuers should attempt to give “puffs” of air instead of full breaths and watch for the chest to rise.

Finally, the other major difference between doing CPR on a adult / child versus an infant is the location and force of chest compressions. When land-marking for chest compressions for an infant the rescuers should have two fingers just below the nipple line. An effective way to landmark is to place three fingers, side by side, along the infants chest with the top finger between the nipples and the other two fingers below, side by side, towards the victims legs.  Once the rescuer has there fingers in this position, the rescuer can lift the top finger that was between the nipples and keep the other two fingers which should be in the correct area for chest compressions. The force between the chest compressions should be obviously less than the force required for an adult or child.

To learn how to do proper and effective CPR on an adult, child or infant take a CPR C class with Vancouver First Aid. Our Red Cross Vancouver certifications are nationally accredited and are valid for up to 3 years. Vancouver First Aid Ltd also offers Red Cross courses in Richmond, Burnaby and Surrey.

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