Posted in CPR
by
Tuesday, 27 September 2011
with comment off

Vancouver First Aid proudly incorporates Child CPR into all of its First Aid and CPR training.  CPR-B is no longer offered as a stand alone CPR course because the methods for CPR on Adults is nearly identical to that for Children. Because of the similarity between CPR-A and CPR-B, the material taught in CPR-B is now incorporated into CPR level A. This blog will focus on the minor differences between adult and child CPR.

Prior to introducing the differences of between child and adult CPR its important to differentiate, in the world of first aid and CPR, how you differentiate between an adult and a child. This has brought a lot of confusion to CPR. At one point, a child was determined by the weight of the victim, but some rescuers got confused and had a hard time determining the weight of a unconscious victim. Size differences brought along the same problems. Age was also used, but rescuers were delayed in there rescues as some found it difficult to determine the age of the unconscious victim. The best method of determining whether the victim is to be treated as an adult or child is by using signs of puberty. If the rescuers notices signs of puberty on the victim (facial hair, bone structure, breast growth), then they are to be treated as an adult. Using signs of puberty is the clearest method of determining whether to do adult or child CPR.

Child CPR differs from adult CPR most significantly when the application of an AED is involved. AED’s can come with three different pads. They have the traditional adult pads, some also have child pads and a very few have pediatric pads for infants. Adult pads can be applied on a child as long as they do not come within 1 inch of each other. They can be applied using the same placement as on a adult or they can be applied the same way as child pads are (front and back). Child pads can also be used on a child, however, because they lack the energy output, they can not be applied to an adult victim.  If the rescuer does not know whether to apply adult or child pads, he or she can use the adult pads and keep them at least one inch apart. Rescuers must also keep in mind that AED pads are one time use only and that he or she should be careful to place it correctly on the first attempt.

A small difference between adult and child CPR is the compression depth on an child when doing chest compression’s. Two inches is the minimum for an adult and two inch’s is the goal for a child. However, since rescuers rarely bring rulers with them when applying CPR it isn’t beneficial to promote the use of the inch’s when determining proper depth of chest compression’s.  To keep things simple, the rescuer should attempt to do chest compression’s to a depth of one half or one third the depth of an adult, child and infant. The number of chest compression’s for a child, when compared to Adult CPR, does not change. The ratio of 30 chest compression’s to 2 breaths is identical whether it is an adult, child or infant.

When a child is dramatically smaller than the rescuer the rescuer should use one hand when doing chest compression’s. The free hand can be used to keep the airway open to minimize time between cycles of chest compression’s when ventilating the victim. However, to minimize confusion, the rescuer, if not sure, can do two handed CPR.

Child CPR does not differ much from adult CPR. Other than the type of pads and the application of pads when using a AED there aren’t any major differences between adult CPR and child CPR. The same CPR standards that are applied for a adult rescue can be used for a child.

The material posted in this blog is for information purposes only. If you want to learn more about Child CPR and its differences from Adult CPR receive first aid and CPR training from Vancouver First Aid Ltd. First Aid and CPR classes in Surrey are now being offered. To register for a course select the course of your choosing from the menu bar or from the side bar. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call at 778.709.9180, email at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca or use our “contact us” page. Learn to save the life of a loved one by taking an adult and child CPR course in Vancouver.

Posted in CPR
by
Friday, 23 September 2011
with comment off

CPR A and CPR C Lesson with Vancouver First Aid Ltd.

Divide The Class into Appropriate Groups.

Activity 1 (20 minutes)

Divide Class into Groups

1 – Presentation on Red Cross – What is it? What do they do?

2 – Anatomy – Draw us the Human Body and What does the Brain, Heart and Lungs do?

3 – How do you do CPR?

4 – What Does CPR do?

5 – When to stop CPR or not do it at all.

*Team name for each group written on top of Flipchart

*They have to present there flipchart to the class (1 Vanna White, 1 Pat Sayjak)

 

Activity 2

Adult Basic CPR– Non Breathing – Unconscious

(a)Demo CPR on a Adult (1 minute)

(b)Describe Each Step (5 minutes)

(c) As a group have them each do the CPR on a manikin

(d) Have them each go at there own pace

-Stop them when they are going over the CPR and time the compressions (compression only – for 1 minute)

-Go over details of compressions.

 

Activity 3

Divide class into as many groups as instructors.

Each group gets on manikin to do Basic CPR on

1st person from each group does step 1, 2nd person does step 1 and 2, 3rd person does step 1, 2 and 3, etc…

For each mistake the group needs to start again.

 

 Activity 4

Unconscous Obstructed Airway

(a)Demo CPR on a Adult (1 minute)

(b)Describe Each Step (5 minutes)

(c) As a group have them each do the CPR on a manikin

*Really drill into them that the only difference is hook and look after 30 chest compression’s.

 

Activity 5Child CPR (CPR-B)

Difference Between Adult and Child

Explain to the class the differences / or lack of, between adult and child.

Show them the options of one or two hands and have them try.

Have them DO CPR for a child.

 

Activity 6. – Protective Equipment

Explain to the class the precautions and why use gloves and pocket mask

Hand each participant a pocket mask and Demo, Describe, Do CPR with a pocket mask.

 

 Activity 7. – AED’s

Divide the class into groups of 3.

Hand each group an AED and have them attempt to make it part of there CPR process. Also, have them attempt to CPR with more than one trained rescuer. *Have them do CPR for a while before introducing the AED.

After they have had a try DISCOVERING how to use an AED, Demo, Describe, Do.

 

Activity 8. – Choking Victims – Conscious.

Outline a fun story that leads to choking.

Demo, Describe Do.

*Explain the top choking hazards (Grapes, Hot Dogs (sausages), etc.)

*Explain how to treat for complications for Choking Hazards.

Lead into Choking Victims – Unconscious.

-Start with 9.1.1 and hook and look.

 

Activity 9.  – Choking Victims – Conscious to Unconscious.

Have the class pair up and teach this portion to the other classmate and receive feedback. If they can teach it, then they know it. Give them 10 minutes to teach and give feedback.

 

Activity 10. – Complications

Recovery Position – Demo, Describe, Do.

Vomitting – Demo, Describe, Do.

Regurgitation – Demo, Describe, Do.

 

Activity 11 – Differences between Child and Infant unconscious, conscious obstructed and unconscious obstructed.

Demo Describe and Do.

 

Activity 12 – Follow Activity 3 for Infant Choking. Start again if there are any errors.

 

Activity 13 – Pocket Masks for infants.

 

The material posted in this blog on CPR or First Aid training with Vancouver First Aid Ltd is for information purposes only. It is to be used only by Vancouver First Aid Ltd unless expressed and written consent is provided. For information on First Aid and CPR training take a course with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. To register for a course select the course of your choosing from the menu or side bar. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call at 778.709.9180, email at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca or contact us via our “contact us” page.  Learn to save a life and take CPR training today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in CPR
by
Tuesday, 20 September 2011

CPR C is a eight hour course that teaches candidates cardiopulmonary resuscitation on adults and children. To complete the CPR training a simple multiple choice test needs to be completed with a minimum score of 80%. Candidates are also required to recognize victims and dangers and to show the instructor how to do CPR for the following scenarios in addition to the CPR A requirements:

Scenario 6: Infant is not breathing. 
  • Dangers: No
  • Infants Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Infant is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Ask for permission from parents / guardians.
  3. Assess victims level of consciousness (Grab infants legs and Shout).
  4. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  5. Carefully open the airway (Head-tilt, chin lift) with chin and nose parallel to the ground.
  6. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  7. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths / puffs (puffs – enough air to blow out a single candle) into the victim. Rescuer must seal the victims mouth and nose with his or her lips. If the first breath does not enter the lungs, rescuer must re-adjust the airway. In this scenario, after the readjustment, the breaths go in. 
  8. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s just below the infants nipple line.
  9. Give 2 breaths (puffs).
  10. Continue to do 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths until you are too tired to continue, more advanced help arrives, or victims shows signs of life.
Scenario 7: Infant has a obstructed airway.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Ask for permission from parents / guardians.
  3. Assess victims level of consciousness (Grab infants legs and Shout).
  4. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  5. Carefully open the airway (Head-tilt, chin lift) with chin and nose parallel to the ground.
  6. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  7. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths / puffs (puffs – enough air to blow out a single candle) into the victim. Rescuer must seal the victims mouth and nose with his or her lips.  The first breath does not enter the lungs. Rescuer re-adjusts and the 2nd breath does not enter.
  8. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s.
  9. Look into the victims mouth, hook the tongue down and sweep the object with your pinky finger only if present (also known as: HOOK and LOOK). DO NOT sweep in the mouth if no object is present.
  10. Attempt to ventilate.
  11. Continue steps 7 through 9 until the object is removed. Once removed, continue CPR (30 chest compression’s to 2 puffs) until victim shows signs of life.
Scenario 8: Infant is conscious and choking.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Conscious.
  • Victim is coughing forcefully.
Rescuers Actions:
  1. Scene assessment
  2. If infant is coughing, promote the infant to keep coughing. Reassure the infant. If obstruction is not cleared and victim can no longer cough, continue to next step.
  3. Introduce yourself to the victim parents / guardians and ask for permission to help. Parents / guardians must grant rescuer permission before rescuer can continue. If permission granted, continue to next step.
  4. Rescuer must position him / her self onto there knees and place the infant, with the head in the palm of the hand, and the infants body on the forearm. The infant should be on the forearm, at a 45 degree angle downwards, on top of the rescuers thighs. The rescuer will do 5 chest compressions, with proper landmarking, from this position.
  5. The rescuer will alternate the infant onto the rescuers other forearm / hand with the infant now facing downward (back facing rescuer). The rescuer will do 5 back blows with the heel of his or her hand between the shoulder blades of the infant.
  6. Cycle through steps 5 and 6 until the airway obstruction is removed or until the victim goes unconscious. If the victim goes unconscious, continue to next step.
  7. Contact EMS.
  8. Look into the victims mouth using method described in scenario 7 (hook and look). Continue to do CPR mentioned in Scenario 7 (Look into the victims mouth after 30 chest compression and before attempted ventilation’s).

AED Protocol for infant and child:

AED protocol remains the same for children but rescuers need to be able to use AED pads for children. Adult pads are applicable to children, however, must be placed in such a way that they are apart by at least 1 inch. Child pads CAN NOT be used on a adult. Pads exist for infants, however, they must only be pediatric pads. Candidates are not required to know how to use or place pediatric pads. If no bystanders are present and a AED is nearby, rescuers should do 2 minutes of CPR before retrieving AED.

EMS Protocol for infant and child:

If no bystanders are present rescuers should do 2 minutes of CPR and leave the child or infant in recovery position before leaving to contact EMS. If victim is small enough, rescuer can take victim with him or her to contact EMS.

Vomitting and Protective Equipment remains the same for CPR for adults and children in CPR level C.

The material posted here is for information purposes only. To learn to how to and when to do CPR take CPR training in Vancouver with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. We also offer CPR training in Surrey and throughout the Lower Mainland. To register for a CPR course select the course from the menu bar or the side bar and complete the registration form. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to use our “contact us” page, call us at 778.709.9180 or email us at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca . Learn to save the life of a loved one and take a CPR class.

The following is a basic video on CPR and AED techniques for adult rescue.

Techniques shown in this video by our Red Cross CPR instructor show the most up to date standards of CPR set by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) for 2011 and 2012.

Posted in CPR
by
Monday, 19 September 2011

CPR A is a four to five hour course that teaches candidates cardiopulmonary resuscitation on adults and children. To complete CPR level “A” training a simple multiple choice test needs to be completed with a minimum score of 80%. The material posted on this page is for information purposes only. To learn to recognize and treat patients take a CPR level “A” course in Vancouver or Surrey. Candidates are also required to recognize victims and dangers and to show the instructor how to do CPR for the following scenarios:

Scenario 1: Dangers Present.

  • Dangers: Yes.
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. The first step is scene assessment. The rescuer can not enter the scene unless it is safe. In this scenario, the rescuer can not enter the scene.

Scenario 2: Victim is breathing but not conscious.

  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim IS breathing but unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Assess victims level of consciousness (Pinch and Shout).
  3. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  4. Open the Airway (Head-tilt, chin lift)
  5. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  6. Victim is breathing. Rescuer should place victim in recovery position in continue to monitor vitals.
Scenario 3: Victim is not breathing. 
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Assess victims level of consciousness (Pinch and Shout).
  3. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  4. Open the Airway (Head-tilt, chin lift)
  5. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  6. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths into the victim. If the first breath does not enter the lungs, rescuer must re-adjust the airway. In this scenario, after the readjustment, the breaths go in. 
  7. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s.
  8. Give 2 breaths.
  9. Continue to do 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths until you are too tired to continue, more advanced help arrives, or victims shows signs of life.
Scenario 4: Victim has a obstructed airway.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Assess victims level of consciousness (Pinch and Shout).
  3. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  4. Open the Airway (Head-tilt, chin lift)
  5. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  6. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths into the victim. The first breath does not enter the lungs. Rescuer re-adjusts and the 2nd breath does not enter.
  7. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s.
  8. Look into the victims mouth, hook the tongue down and sweep the object if present. Do not sweep in the mouth if no object is present.
  9. Attempt to ventilate.
  10. Continue steps 7 through 9 until the object is removed. Once removed continue CPR (30 chest compression’s to 2 breaths) until victim shows signs of life.
Scenario 5: Victim is conscious and choking.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Conscious.
  • Victim is coughing forcefully.
Rescuers Actions:
  1. Scene assessment
  2. If victim is coughing, promote the victim to keep coughing. Reassure the victim. If obstruction is not cleared and victim can no longer cough, continue to next step.
  3. Introduce yourself to the victim and ask for permission to help. Victim must grant rescuer permission before rescuer can continue. If permission granted, continue to next step.
  4. Position yourself behind the victim so that you can safely guide the victim to the ground if he/she were to go unconscious.
  5. Landmark on the victims stomach and do 5 J-thrusts.
  6. Pivot next to the victim and do 5 back blows.
  7. Continue to do cycle through steps 4 and 5 until the obstruction is removed or the victim goes unconscious. If the victim goes unconscious, continue to next step.
  8. Contact EMS.
  9. Look into the victims mouth using method described in scenario 4 (hook and look). Continue to do CPR mentioned in Scenario 4 (Look into the victims mouth after 30 chest compression and before attempted ventilation’s).
For All CPR Scenarios:

 

Vomiting and Regurgitation: 
During CPR, if victim regurgitates finish the cycle of chest compression’s and place victim into recovery position to clean out regurgitation. Once airway is clean roll victim back and continue CPR. Regurgitation is not a sign of life. If the victim vomits, stop CPR and move victim into recovery position. Vomiting IS a sign of life. Rescuer must check for vitals while victim is in recovery position. If no vitals are present, rescuer must roll victim back and continue CPR. If vitals are present, continue to monitor vitals and keep victim in recovery position.

 

Protective Equipment:
When helping any patient rescuers must be aware of safety precautions and know how to use proper safety equipment such as gloves and a pocket mask. Rescuers are required to know how to properly ventilate a victim with a pocket mask or a bag valve mask.

 

AED Protocol. 
Rescuer need to know how to apply a AED and follow AED protocols when it arrives on scene for any unconscious and non-breathing victim. Rescuers, if possible should continue CPR when applying a AED (by using a trained bystander), or should immediately stop CPR to apply a AED and follow AED prompts.

 

The material posted in this blog is for information purposes only. To learn to recognize and treat victims with CPR level A take a CPR A course with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. We offer the cheapest, most convenient and comfortable classes in the Lower Mainland. First Aid training in Surrey is now available. To register for a CPR A course with Vancouver First Aid select the course of your choosing from the menu bar or side bar. Fill out the registration form and prepay to guarantee yourself a spot in the class.

 

 

Posted in CPR
by
Thursday, 15 September 2011

The material posted in this blog is for information purposes only. If you want to learn how and when to administer CPR and an AED take CPR training with Vancouver First Aid ltd. We also offer CPR recertification courses and we have a new facility for CPR training in Surrey.

The Scenario: You walk into room and find two parents in distress with the mother holding a infant who is not breathing. The parents say the infant was choking. No signs of C-spine injury. No other injuries.

For CPR HCP with 2011 Guidelines the “Must See’s” to complete this component are:

  1. Scene Assessment. The rescuer must assess the sign and possible mechanisms of injury.
  2. Permission. Rescuer must obtain permission from parents / legal guardian prior to beginning treatment.
  3. Self Protection: To protect the rescuer and patient from disease transmission the rescuer must demonstrate proper use of personal protective equipment including the use of gloves and a breathing barrier. Breathing barrier can include either a bag valve mask or a pocket mask.
  4. Assess level of consciousness – The rescuer must assess the level of consciousness for the victim by shouting and touch / tickling the infant patients’ feet.
  5. Airway – Rescuer must attempt to open the airway of the victim applying a head tilt / chin or jaw thrust. Rescuer should position the infants head to the “sniffing” position or the position in which the chin and the nose are parallel to the ground.
  6. Breathing – Check for breathing by using “look, listen and feel” method for 5 seconds.
  7. Circulation – Check for circulation for 10 seconds.
  8. Activate EMS / Manage Bystanders – The rescuer must know the appropriate procedures for activating EMS and how to effectively use a bystander to contact EMS. Rescuer must also send bystander to locate a AED with pediatric pads.
  9. Start CPR – If the rescuer is a lone rescuer then he or she will begin CPR at 30 compression to 2 breaths. If there are 2 rescuers they will do CPR at 15 compressions to 2 breaths.
  10. AED – Rescuer(s) should begin AED protocol as soon as it arrives on the scene. Rescuers should place the pediatric pads in the appropriate position on the infant victim and follow AED prompts.
  11. ABC Reassessment – Rescuers should reassess the victim every 2 minutes and modify CPR appropriately if a pulse is present but no effective breathing.
  12. Rapid Body Survey – If possible, rescuer should attempt to do a rapid body survey to check for other injuries.

The material posted in this blog on infant CPR is for information purposes only. If you want to learn to recognize and treat a victim at a CPR HCP standard enroll in CPR training with Vancouver First Aid. We offer first aid and CPR classes in Surrey and throughout the Lower Mainland. We offer both Red Cross First Aid and Lifesaving Society First Aid. If you want to register for a full first aid course or a renewal course select the class of your choice from the menu bar or from the side bar. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call us at 778.709.9180 or email us at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca or use our “contact us” page.

The  video shows basic CPR techniques for CPR on a infant using a barrier device known as a pocket mask. All these techniques are taught in all of our hands on CPR classes.

Posted in First Aid
by
Tuesday, 13 September 2011
with 2 comments

The material posted in this blog on Chest Pains, Heart Attacks and Angina is for information purposes only. If you want to learn to recognize and treat heart attack and angina victims take first aid training in the Lower Mainland with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. First Aid and CPR classes in Surrey are now available.

Heart disease is the number one killer in North America. Thousands of people die every year in Canada from heart disease and stroke. Most patients die before reaching the hospital. Without a quick response from a trained CPR and AED rescuer the chances of recovery can be drastically reduced.

To prevent heart disease one should:

  • Lower intake of  high cholesterol and saturated fats
  • Be active and exercise regularly
  • Do not smoke
  • Limit alcohol consumption

Angina occurs when there is a temporary or partial blockage of the arteries supplying blood to the heart. This is caused by blood clots or deposits on the walls of the artery’s. The signs and symptoms that are common to angina and not common signs and symptoms of heart attacks are:

  • Chest Pain Lasts 20 to 30 minutes.
  • Oxygen therapy, rest and medication can relieve the pain.

Heart attacks occur when there is a complete blockage of the arteries supplying blood to the heart. With a complete blockage, parts of the heart begin to die as they no longer receive oxygen. This can lead to cardiac arrest. Signs and symptoms that are common to heart attacks and not Angina include:

  • Chest pain lasts longer than 30 minutes.
  • Neither oxygen therapy or rest can relieve the pain.

Heart attacks and angina have very similar symptoms. The following is a list of symptoms that are common to both heart attack and angina victims:

  • Denial
  • Anxiety
  • Fear
  • Confusion
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weak and rapid pulse (can be difficult to find as victim may be suffering from shock and have weaker heart rate. Check pulse using carotid artery.)
  • Pale, cool and clammy skin.
  • Chest pain (can feel excessive pressure and squeezing around heart)
  • Radiating pain (pain can radiate up to jaw, down the back, neck, shoulders and arms)
  • Nausea
  • Vommitting
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue

The treatment for victims of chest pain includes scene assessment, determining the location and mechanism of the pain (was it from a fall?, etc.) and asking the patient if they have any medication. The rescuer should also assist the victim to sit on the floor or in a comfortable position. Loosen any tight clothing around the victims neck or chest area. If the rescuer is trained to administer oxygen, do so. Treat the patient for shock and monitor vital signs. Contact EMS, and complete primary and secondary surveys. If the patient has medication assist them in taking it. Follow workplace guidelines and policies as to whether the rescuer can administer medication for the patient.

Nitroglycerine

Nitroglycerine is a medication that causes the vessels to dilate which allows any blockage to pass. It comes in either tablet or spray form or it can come as a medication patch. A rescuer should not give a patient Nitroglycerine if the patient is unresponsive or if the patient has taken erectile dysfunction / performance enhancing drugs such as Viagra or Levitra within the past 25 hours or Cialis within the past 96 hours. A maximum of three doses can be given at 5 minute intervals. If the patients nitro does not work or they are wearing the patch contact EMS immediately. Patients who have prescribed Nitroglycerine may also take or need to take ASA.

ASA (Aspirin / acetylsalicylic acid)

ASA, normally called Aspirin is a popular medication for prevention and treatment of cardiac disease. It is a anticoagulant that is a beneficial treatment for heart attacks and angina. Rescuers should follow the following “4 A” protocol prior to assisting the victim to take the medication:

  • Allergic – Ask patient if he or she is allergic to ASA or ibuprofen
  • Asthma – Ask patient if he or she has a history of asthma because asthma and ASA can cause serious negative health complications.
  • Approved – Ask patient if he or she has been approved to take the medication.
  • Active ulcer – Ask the patient if he or she has an active ulcer or stomach bleed or a recent head injury.

The patient is not allowed to substitute any medication such as Tylenol instead of using an ASA. The patient typically takes 1 adult ASA tablet or 2 children’s ASA tablets. It is important to have good communication with the victim so that the appropriate dosage and medication is taken. Do not play doctor. Make sure the victim follows his or her doctors guidelines and medications.

If you want to learn more about heart attacks and angina and how to recognize and treat them take first aid training with Vancouver First Aid ltd. We have many flexible and conveniently located first aid and CPR courses throughout the Lower Mainland. New first aid and CPR classes in Surrey are now available. We offer the cheapest courses in the lower mainland and we try our best to accommodate everybody by rarely cancelling a course or capping our classes. To register for a course select the desired course from the menu bar or from the side bar and choose the course date and time of your choosing. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to ask via our “contact us” page, via email at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca or by calling us at 778.709.9180. We can’t wait to each you how to save a life!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in First Aid
by
Sunday, 11 September 2011

The material posted in this blog on anaphylaxis is for information purposes only. If you want to learn to recognize and treat allergic reactions take first aid training in Vancouver with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. First aid training and CPR in Surrey is now also available.

Anaphylaxis is a severe and possibly life threatening condition created by an allergic reaction. They become life threatening when they affect the respiratory system and the victim can no longer breathe normally. Popular allergens include nuts , seafood and egg and dairy products.

The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis vary per person and per episode. There is no particular order in which the reaction occurs but they typically begin with redness along the back and swelling of facial features such as the lips, tongue and eyes. Other signs and symptoms include:

  • General itching
  • Hives
  • Redness of skin
  • Blotchy skin
  • Swelling,
  • Dizziness
  • Lowered level of consciousness
  • Headache
  • Stomach cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting

The treatment of anaphylaxis includes, determining the need for medication and assisting if required, activating EMS, monitor ABC’s, and reassure patient (treat for shock). Epinephrine is the most commonly used medication for sever allergic reactions. Rescuers must follow employee guidelines and policies in respect to administering medications such as Epinephrine. Lifeguards in Vancouver trained with NLS are taught how to administer an Epinephrine but it is dependant on there employee guidelines whether they are allowed to administer the medication to victims. However, rescuers may assist the victim to take there medication. Patient must only take there medication and the rescuer should not allow the patient to use someone else’s medication. If the victim has difficulty breathing and the patients throat begins to swell, rescuer can apply ice to the throat to reduce swelling. Rescuers, can assist the victim’s breathing by breathing for them. However, rescuers should use protective equipment, such as a pocket mask, when assisting the victims breathing.

Medication

Our bodies produce a hormone named epinephrine, which is also called adrenaline, that it releases in times of stress. Injecting epinephrine into a victim during an allergic reaction can reverse the effects. It is important for the patient to administer the medication as early as possible after the onset of symptoms or known contact of the allergen. The reaction to the medication is almost immediate as it increases the victims heart rate, constricts blood vessels and allows the victim to breathe easier. If the victim takes his or her epinephrine they should still go immediately to the hospital via EMS (paramedics) as the effects of the injection wear off between 10 to 20 minutes of injection. The patient must also be monitored for further treatment.

Patients might be directed to take another medication called Benadryl, which is a antihistamine, after using there auto-injector. Rescuers may also assist the patient to take there antihistamine.

There are two types of epinephrine auto-injectors. One is the EpiPen and the other is the Twinjet. When using an epinephrine auto-injector, such as the EpiPen or Twinjet, the medication should not be used if the solution is discolored (pink or brown) regardless if it is in-date. If the patient has an outdated auto-injector, the patient is allowed to take the medication if the solution is clear and it is the only source of epinephrine. With the medication being outdated it is likely to be less effective and wear off quickly.

To apply medication patients must follow labelled instructions and hold injection in place for 10 seconds and slowly removing the injection. It is important to slowly remove the injection as it may have contacted bone and not released the full dosage during the 10 seconds. The Twinjet is slightly more complicated as it contains two dosages. 1 of out every 3 victims is required to have a second dose of epinephrine within 10 minutes of the first dose. The Twinjet contains a valuable second dose of Epinephrine. The first does is apply using the auto-injector. The second dose, if needed, is administered by removing the needle located in the barrel of the device.

Autoinjectors are fairly expensive and cost approximately 105 dollars. They also need to be replaced within every 6 months prior to expiry. It costs over 1000 dollars for someone to have an epipen for 5 years. With the medication being this expensive some people can not afford to own an Epipen. Some people forget there auto-injector. Others do not carry them everywhere as they can be bulky and large. It is important to have the skills to treat for anaphylaxis even if the victim does not have there medication with them.

To learn how to treat and recognize anaphylaxis and other life threatening emergencies take a  first aid course with Vancouver First Aid. Vancouver First Aid Ltd offers Red Cross first aid and Lifesaving Society first aid throughout the Lower Mainland including in Surrey, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam and Vancouver. New first aid and CPR courses are available in Surrey. To register for a course select the course of your choosing from the sidebar or from the main menu bar located at the top of the page. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact us via telephone at 778.709.9180 or via email at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca . Learn to save the life of a loved one by learning first aid and CPR.

Anaphylaxis Facts:

500 deaths are recorded yearly from food allergens. (Lifesaving Society)

Over 3 million people in North America have a nut or peanut allergy. (Lifesaving Society)

5% of of children under the age of 3 suffer from a food allergy and 80% of the time they are out of parental care. (Lifesaving Society)

Posted in AED, CPR
by
Friday, 09 September 2011
with comment off

The material posted in this blog on AED guidelines for CPR is for information purposes only. To learn to recognize and treat victims requiring a AED take a first aid and / or CPR class with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. Locations have expanded to include first aid training in Surrey and UBC.

To give any victim the best chance of survival the rescuer must implement the use of an AED. An AED is an automated external defibrillator created to flat-line irregular heart beats, such as ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, in hopes of normalizing heart rhythms. The use of an AED can increase survival rates of victims from a low 1 to 2% with rescuers doing just CPR, to 8% with rescuers doing CPR and applying a AED. Because of the improved chances of recovery the Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, Heart and Stroke Foundation, St. John’s Ambulance and all other major providers have put AED training into all of there first aid and CPR curriculum.

The first step in using an AED is recognize the situation. Rescuers must assess the situation and send a bystander to contact EMS and locate a AED and additional help to use it. If the rescuer is alone he or she must call 911 and retrieve the AED (if nearby) before starting CPR on the victim. If the victim is either a child or an infant, the rescuer will perform 5 cycles of CPR (2 minutes) prior to calling EMS and obtaining an AED (if nearby). This is due to the fact that most children and infants suffer from respiratory arrest rather than cardiac arrest so the 2 minutes of CPR can be very successful.

The use of an AED on infants is only a knowledge component in first aid and CPR courses because the likelihood of a lay rescuer obtaining a AED with infant defibrillator pads is very low.

There are approximately two dozen types of AED’s available. It is important for rescuers to understand the basic principles of AED use. AED’s typically have two buttons: a shock button and a on/power button. After pushing the on / power button the AED will give instructions on how to operate it.

Tips on AED use:

  • AED pads must be placed on bare skin. The pads can not be placed over top medical patches (nitrod, nicotine, birth control, etc.) or pacemakers. Place the pad below the pacemaker.
  • Adult pads can be used on adults and children. Child pads can not be used on an adult as they do not carry a sufficient shock. The adult pads must be placed on the child no closer than one inch apart. They can also be placed on the front of the chest and on the back (the same way child pads are placed).
  • The AED pads are one time use. Be careful when using gloves (it is mandatory to use gloves) as the pads will adhere to the gloves.  Rescuers should also be careful in the placement of the pads as they can not be removed and used again.  Apply the pads as one would typically apply a band-aid (without touching the adhesive).
  • Unless the victim shows signs of life, the rescuer(s) must always be prepared to continue to do CPR after the analyze and “shock” or “no shock” prompts.
  • Most course guidelines promote rescuers to shave the chest of a hairy victim. However, significant evidence also suggests that the pads will still adhere and shock when placed on a hairy chest. Furthermore, the time required to shave a hairy chest with a single blade razor (typically only single blade razors are placed with AED’s and first aid kits) can take a substantial amount of time. Do your own research and make your decision on whether to follow the guideline to shave the victim’s chest. However, Red Cross and Lifesaving Society guidelines recommend that the rescuer shave the victims chest, if it is hairy, prior to pad placement.
  • Prior to applying the pads, the chest must be dry. The pads will not stick to a wet chest. Wipe off any water or sweat off of the victim prior to pad placement.
  • Victim should not have any part of the body in freestanding or still water. Victim must be in a dry area if possible. Research done by General Electric states that if the victim and rescuer are in the same “puddle” when the shock phase of the AED is occurring the rescuer will not feel any significant shock. Do your own research. However, the Red Cross and Lifesaving Society recommend that rescuers not have the victims in any form of water when using an AED.
  • Rescuers hands should be dry when applying an AED.
  • You can use an AED on victims that have been electrocuted or struck by lightning
  • If the victim is on a conductive metal surface clear all bystanders away from the area, wear non-conductive footwear and latex gloves, and stand when adminstering the shock (try not to move or hold a metal railing)
  • If adminstering oxygen remove from victims face when analyzing and adminstering shock.
  • Use the AED on a pregnant mother. You need to save the mother first before you can save the baby.
  • Continue AED protocols if you come a cross a AICD (autmoated implantable Cardio Defibrillators), however, place the pads approximately 1 inch away from the AICD or any pacemaker.

The material posted in this blog is for information purposes only. To learn how to use an AED and to learn CPR with 2011 AED guidelines take first aid training with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. First aid and CPR training in Surrey is now available.  To register for a first aid course select the class of your choice from the menu bar or from the side bar. You can also contact us via our “contact us” page, by email at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca or by phone at 778-709-9180. We offer convenient, comfortable and affordable first aid classes throughout the lower mainland. We also offer first aid and CPR recertifications.

Posted in CPR
by
Wednesday, 07 September 2011
with comment off

The material posted in this blog is for information purposes only. If you want to learn how to recognize and treat a conscious choking adult and child victims take a CPR or first aid course with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. CPR courses in Surrey are now available.

A rescuer must first recognize that a victim is choking. The victim with a mild obstruction / partial obstruction will be coughing forcefully and will likely have his or her hands around there neck. This is recognized as the international symbol for choking, however, some victims might not have there hands placed around there neck. In a scenario in which a victim has a partial obstruction, the rescuer should reassure the victim that everything will be ok and to promote the victim to keep coughing.

If the victim is unable to cough and has significantly more difficulty breathing than the rescuer must act accordingly. If the victim can no longer cough the patient is now suffering from a severe obstruction. First, the rescuer should continue to reassure the victim to keep them calm. Next, the rescuer needs to ask for permission to help the victim. The rescuer needs to be aware that the victim can not speak and that the answer from the victim will come visually usually a nod or a shake from the head. The rescuer should explain to the victim that he or she is trained in first aid. Once the rescuer has obtained approval from the victim, the rescuer will position him/her self behind the victim in such a way as to support the victim in case he or she goes unconscious. The rescuer has only moments to react as the victim can becoming unconscious within a minute if the situation does not improve. After the rescuer positions him / her self behind the victim he or she will locate the victims hips and reach towards the front of the stomach until both hands meet which is usually one or two inches below the belly button. This is how the rescuer will landmark for the correct location to do “J” thrusts. “J” thrusts are significantly more effective than the Heimlich maneuver even though they are both very similar. The rescuer will tuck one thumb into his or her fist and place that fist (thumb facing the belly button), with the other arm holding the the fist (as if hugging the victim), at the land-marked position mentioned earlier. The rescuer will pull in towards the victims stomach (like the Heimlich maneuver) but rather than stop as soon as the rescuer can not pull anymore, the rescuer will continue to pull upwards creating the figure “J”. This is called a “J” thrust. After 5 “J” thrusts, the rescuer will position him / her self beside the victim so that they are facing the side of the victims head and slowly bend the victim over so that the patients airway is parallel to the ground. If available, the victim can hold onto a desk, counter top or the edge of chair. For added support the rescuer should hold onto the patient with one arm underneath the victims arm and holding onto the shoulder from the front in case the victim goes unconscious. With the victim bent forward the rescuer will deliver 5 firm back blows between the shoulder blades of the patient. The back blows should be delivered using the heel of the rescuers hands. The rescuer will alternate between 5 back blows and 5 “J” thrusts until the obstruction is cleared or until the victim losses consciousness.

To learn how to rescue an unconscious choking victim or a victim with complications (pregnant, infant, obese, etc.) take CPR or First Aid training with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. Candidates will receive hands on first aid and CPR training and the confidence and practise to apply these skills in real life situations. Vancouver First Aid Ltd. now offers first aid training in Surrey and CPR classes in Surrey.

To register for a CPR class select the course from the menu or side bar. Vancouver First Aid Ltd also offers private courses and private infant CPR courses.

Posted in CPR, First Aid
by
Monday, 05 September 2011
with comment off

The material posted in this blog on New CPR is for information puproses only. If you want to learn to do CPR, receive proper training by taking a Red Cross CPR course. The most comprehensive course for lay rescuers is CPR level “C” which is also offered at our training centers.

Several changes have been implemented / recommended to the Red Cross and Lifesaving Society to promote and ensure high quality CPR. The new CPR standards include:

  • Chest compressions must be at a rate of at least 100 chest compressions per minute for adults, infants and children. The previous standards were for chest compressions to be approximately 100 per minute.
  • Chest compression depth must be at a depth of at least 2 inches for adults. Previously, the standard chest compression depth for an adult was 1.5 to 2 inches.
  • Chest compression depth for children and infants is to be at least one third the chest (about 2 inches for child and 1.5 inches for infants), instead of previous recommendation of approximately 1/3 the chest.
  • The maximum alloted time for a rescuer to not be doing chest compressions (ventilations) is 10 seconds instead of the previous recommentation of minimizing interruptions.
  • To continue to promote effective CPR the Red Cross and Lifesaving Society are promoting that rescuers allow for a full recoil of the chest in between chest compressions.

Changes in the implementation of AED’s has also been introduced to the Lifesaving Society and Red Cross programs:

  • A lone rescuer will call 911 and retrieve a AED if it is located nearby before beginning CPR on an  adult.
  • A lone rescuer will perform 2 minutes of CPR on a child or infant before calling 911 and retrieving an AED.
  • Rescuers can ask for bystanders to retrieve an AED for an infant eventhough the likelihood of an infant pediatric pads to be found in a AED is low and the likelihood for an infant to be in cardiac arrest is also very low.

Vancouver First Aid Ltd promotes the highest quality CPR and first aid standards. We quickly adapt any new CPR standards into our program. We are also expanding and offering first aid training in Surrey and CPR courses in Surrey. Our first aid courses are located throughout the Lower Mainland in comfortable and convenient locations. We try our best to never cancel a class (99% guarantee) and we promise to offer the cheapest first aid training in Vancouver.

Accepted Payment Methods