Am I allergic to cigarette smoke?

Individuals who are exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke face a high risk for developing respiratory issues such as asthma, allergies and other respiratory illnesses. Always bear in mind that cigarette smoke can disrupt with the layer of the lung epithelial and promotes the easy penetration of the allergens by compromising the distinctive defense mechanisms in the lungs. The symptoms of cigarette allergy are strikingly similar to asthma which includes wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and impaired lung function.

Indoor cigarette smoke

The particulate matter from indoor cigarette smoking can worsen the inflammation of the airways, wheezing and chronic coughing among non-smokers. Based on the studies conducted, it was discovered that being exposed to smoke and particulate matter from candles, wooden stoves and gas stoves was not significantly linked to the onset of the asthma-like symptoms.

Nevertheless, in a study performed those who were left to inhale indoor cigarette smoking for more than 5 hours face a higher risk for the ending up with allergy symptoms such as chronic coughing, wheezing and diminished lung function unlike those who were not exposed.

Allergic conditions

Being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke has a high risk for developing respiratory conditions and allergy among children. Even though there is no clear link between maternal smoking and incidence for allergy, being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke during the first months of life was linked to a significant increase in allergies and respiratory diseases among children.

Respiratory illnesses

Early childhood and prenatal exposure to second-hand smoke can increase the risk of children to develop respiratory illnesses. It is important to note that cessation of smoking and avoidance must be priorities for women of child-bearing age as well as those who have young children.

Diminished lung function

Cigarette smoke

The particulate matter from indoor cigarette smoking can worsen the inflammation of the airways, wheezing and chronic coughing among non-smokers.

The particulates present in tobacco smoke are the common yet avoidable airborne toxins that are clearly linked with impaired lung growth, wheezing and susceptibility to bacterial lung infections in children.

In one study, it was discovered that exposure to cigarette smoke adversely affects the innate immune function which predisposes children to microbial infections. Always bear in mind that parental smoking is a vital contributing factor to respiratory bacterial infections and allergies among children.

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