CPR A and AED Requirements.

CPR A is a four to five hour course that teaches candidates cardiopulmonary resuscitation on adults and children. To complete CPR level “A” training a simple multiple choice test needs to be completed with a minimum score of 80%. The material posted on this page is for information purposes only. To learn to recognize and treat patients take a CPR level “A” course in Vancouver or Surrey. Candidates are also required to recognize victims and dangers and to show the instructor how to do CPR for the following scenarios:

Scenario 1: Dangers Present.

  • Dangers: Yes.
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. The first step is scene assessment. The rescuer can not enter the scene unless it is safe. In this scenario, the rescuer can not enter the scene.

Scenario 2: Victim is breathing but not conscious.

  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim IS breathing but unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Assess victims level of consciousness (Pinch and Shout).
  3. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  4. Open the Airway (Head-tilt, chin lift)
  5. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  6. Victim is breathing. Rescuer should place victim in recovery position in continue to monitor vitals.
Scenario 3: Victim is not breathing. 
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Assess victims level of consciousness (Pinch and Shout).
  3. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  4. Open the Airway (Head-tilt, chin lift)
  5. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  6. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths into the victim. If the first breath does not enter the lungs, rescuer must re-adjust the airway. In this scenario, after the readjustment, the breaths go in. 
  7. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s.
  8. Give 2 breaths.
  9. Continue to do 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths until you are too tired to continue, more advanced help arrives, or victims shows signs of life.
Scenario 4: Victim has a obstructed airway.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Assess victims level of consciousness (Pinch and Shout).
  3. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  4. Open the Airway (Head-tilt, chin lift)
  5. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  6. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths into the victim. The first breath does not enter the lungs. Rescuer re-adjusts and the 2nd breath does not enter.
  7. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s.
  8. Look into the victims mouth, hook the tongue down and sweep the object if present. Do not sweep in the mouth if no object is present.
  9. Attempt to ventilate.
  10. Continue steps 7 through 9 until the object is removed. Once removed continue CPR (30 chest compression’s to 2 breaths) until victim shows signs of life.
Scenario 5: Victim is conscious and choking.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Conscious.
  • Victim is coughing forcefully.
Rescuers Actions:
  1. Scene assessment
  2. If victim is coughing, promote the victim to keep coughing. Reassure the victim. If obstruction is not cleared and victim can no longer cough, continue to next step.
  3. Introduce yourself to the victim and ask for permission to help. Victim must grant rescuer permission before rescuer can continue. If permission granted, continue to next step.
  4. Position yourself behind the victim so that you can safely guide the victim to the ground if he/she were to go unconscious.
  5. Landmark on the victims stomach and do 5 J-thrusts.
  6. Pivot next to the victim and do 5 back blows.
  7. Continue to do cycle through steps 4 and 5 until the obstruction is removed or the victim goes unconscious. If the victim goes unconscious, continue to next step.
  8. Contact EMS.
  9. Look into the victims mouth using method described in scenario 4 (hook and look). Continue to do CPR mentioned in Scenario 4 (Look into the victims mouth after 30 chest compression and before attempted ventilation’s).
For All CPR Scenarios:

 

Vomiting and Regurgitation: 
During CPR, if victim regurgitates finish the cycle of chest compression’s and place victim into recovery position to clean out regurgitation. Once airway is clean roll victim back and continue CPR. Regurgitation is not a sign of life. If the victim vomits, stop CPR and move victim into recovery position. Vomiting IS a sign of life. Rescuer must check for vitals while victim is in recovery position. If no vitals are present, rescuer must roll victim back and continue CPR. If vitals are present, continue to monitor vitals and keep victim in recovery position.

 

Protective Equipment:
When helping any patient rescuers must be aware of safety precautions and know how to use proper safety equipment such as gloves and a pocket mask. Rescuers are required to know how to properly ventilate a victim with a pocket mask or a bag valve mask.

 

AED Protocol. 
Rescuer need to know how to apply a AED and follow AED protocols when it arrives on scene for any unconscious and non-breathing victim. Rescuers, if possible should continue CPR when applying a AED (by using a trained bystander), or should immediately stop CPR to apply a AED and follow AED prompts.

 

The material posted in this blog is for information purposes only. To learn to recognize and treat victims with CPR level A take a CPR A course with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. We offer the cheapest, most convenient and comfortable classes in the Lower Mainland. First Aid training in Surrey is now available. To register for a CPR A course with Vancouver First Aid select the course of your choosing from the menu bar or side bar. Fill out the registration form and prepay to guarantee yourself a spot in the class.

 

 

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