CPR C and AED requirements. 2011.

CPR C is a eight hour course that teaches candidates cardiopulmonary resuscitation on adults and children. To complete the CPR training a simple multiple choice test needs to be completed with a minimum score of 80%. Candidates are also required to recognize victims and dangers and to show the instructor how to do CPR for the following scenarios in addition to the CPR A requirements:

Scenario 6: Infant is not breathing. 
  • Dangers: No
  • Infants Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Infant is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Ask for permission from parents / guardians.
  3. Assess victims level of consciousness (Grab infants legs and Shout).
  4. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  5. Carefully open the airway (Head-tilt, chin lift) with chin and nose parallel to the ground.
  6. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  7. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths / puffs (puffs – enough air to blow out a single candle) into the victim. Rescuer must seal the victims mouth and nose with his or her lips. If the first breath does not enter the lungs, rescuer must re-adjust the airway. In this scenario, after the readjustment, the breaths go in. 
  8. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s just below the infants nipple line.
  9. Give 2 breaths (puffs).
  10. Continue to do 30 chest compression’s and 2 breaths until you are too tired to continue, more advanced help arrives, or victims shows signs of life.
Scenario 7: Infant has a obstructed airway.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Unconscious.
  • Victim is NOT breathing and is unresponsive.

Rescuers Actions:

  1. Scene Assessment.
  2. Ask for permission from parents / guardians.
  3. Assess victims level of consciousness (Grab infants legs and Shout).
  4. Send a bystander to contact EMS.
  5. Carefully open the airway (Head-tilt, chin lift) with chin and nose parallel to the ground.
  6. Check for Breathing (Maximum ten second check for normal breathing)
  7. Victim is not breathing. Rescuer needs to ventilate two breaths / puffs (puffs – enough air to blow out a single candle) into the victim. Rescuer must seal the victims mouth and nose with his or her lips.  The first breath does not enter the lungs. Rescuer re-adjusts and the 2nd breath does not enter.
  8. Expose the chest and begin 30 chest compression’s.
  9. Look into the victims mouth, hook the tongue down and sweep the object with your pinky finger only if present (also known as: HOOK and LOOK). DO NOT sweep in the mouth if no object is present.
  10. Attempt to ventilate.
  11. Continue steps 7 through 9 until the object is removed. Once removed, continue CPR (30 chest compression’s to 2 puffs) until victim shows signs of life.
Scenario 8: Infant is conscious and choking.
  • Dangers: No
  • Victims Level of Consciousness: Conscious.
  • Victim is coughing forcefully.
Rescuers Actions:
  1. Scene assessment
  2. If infant is coughing, promote the infant to keep coughing. Reassure the infant. If obstruction is not cleared and victim can no longer cough, continue to next step.
  3. Introduce yourself to the victim parents / guardians and ask for permission to help. Parents / guardians must grant rescuer permission before rescuer can continue. If permission granted, continue to next step.
  4. Rescuer must position him / her self onto there knees and place the infant, with the head in the palm of the hand, and the infants body on the forearm. The infant should be on the forearm, at a 45 degree angle downwards, on top of the rescuers thighs. The rescuer will do 5 chest compressions, with proper landmarking, from this position.
  5. The rescuer will alternate the infant onto the rescuers other forearm / hand with the infant now facing downward (back facing rescuer). The rescuer will do 5 back blows with the heel of his or her hand between the shoulder blades of the infant.
  6. Cycle through steps 5 and 6 until the airway obstruction is removed or until the victim goes unconscious. If the victim goes unconscious, continue to next step.
  7. Contact EMS.
  8. Look into the victims mouth using method described in scenario 7 (hook and look). Continue to do CPR mentioned in Scenario 7 (Look into the victims mouth after 30 chest compression and before attempted ventilation’s).

AED Protocol for infant and child:

AED protocol remains the same for children but rescuers need to be able to use AED pads for children. Adult pads are applicable to children, however, must be placed in such a way that they are apart by at least 1 inch. Child pads CAN NOT be used on a adult. Pads exist for infants, however, they must only be pediatric pads. Candidates are not required to know how to use or place pediatric pads. If no bystanders are present and a AED is nearby, rescuers should do 2 minutes of CPR before retrieving AED.

EMS Protocol for infant and child:

If no bystanders are present rescuers should do 2 minutes of CPR and leave the child or infant in recovery position before leaving to contact EMS. If victim is small enough, rescuer can take victim with him or her to contact EMS.

Vomitting and Protective Equipment remains the same for CPR for adults and children in CPR level C.

The material posted here is for information purposes only. To learn to how to and when to do CPR take CPR training in Vancouver with Vancouver First Aid Ltd. We also offer CPR training in Surrey and throughout the Lower Mainland. To register for a CPR course select the course from the menu bar or the side bar and complete the registration form. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to use our “contact us” page, call us at 778.709.9180 or email us at info@vancouverfirstaid.ca . Learn to save the life of a loved one and take a CPR class.

The following is a basic video on CPR and AED techniques for adult rescue.

Techniques shown in this video by our Red Cross CPR instructor show the most up to date standards of CPR set by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) for 2011 and 2012.

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