Enteric campylobacteriosis

Enteric campylobacteriosis is an infection involving the small intestine brought about by the Campylobacter bacteria. Generally, it is the usual cause of diarrhea and intestinal infection globally.

What are the indications?

The signs typically arise 2-3 days. Some do not have any symptoms. In case the symptoms manifest, it generally includes:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea and blood-streaked stool
  • Stomach cramps
  • Headache, fever and muscle pain during the initial 24 hours of infection
  • Dehydration which can cause nausea, dizziness, dry mouth, headaches, fatigue and diminished urination
  • Constant urge to pass stool
  • Vomiting (rare)
    Enteric campylobacteriosis

    Headache, fever and muscle pain during the initial 24 hours of infection.

Management of enteric campylobacteriosis

Generally, enteric campylobacteriosis settles on its own after a few days while most can recover within 2 days without requiring specific treatment.

In severe cases, it might take up to 10 days for the infection to subside. Generally, antibiotics are useful if started early and can shorten the duration of the symptoms while some of the commonly used antibiotics include ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and azithromycin.

What is the long-term outlook?

In most cases, the symptoms should subside in a week. Nevertheless, this infection is dangerous among the elderly and those who have weakened immune systems.

In rare instances, some develop Guillain-Barre syndrome. Consequently, others might develop post-infectious arthritis, but this is also considered rare.

Preventive measures

The risk for acquiring enteric campylobacteriosis can be lowered by observing good kitchen hygiene such as:

  • Cook meat and poultry properly
  • Regularly wash hands before eating meals
  • Thoroughly clean all cooking and cleaning utensils
  • Use separate cutting boards for meat and other foods
  • Lastly, avoid unpasteurized milk

FACT CHECK

https://www.healthline.com/health/campylobacter-enteritis

https://www.cdc.gov/campylobacter/index.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campylobacteriosis

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