Is there are connection between heat and headaches?

The warm and sunny weather brings out a day filled with activities to engage in but it can also be a reason why some end up with a headache. An agonizing headache can be instigated by any changes in the temperature and humidity. Nevertheless, a headache can also be a symptom of a heat-related condition. It is best that you are prepared to help out an individual experiencing a headache in order to prevent complications from developing. You can learn more about these measures by enrolling in a first aid class today.

What are the causes of headaches?

It is important to note that primary headaches are those that are not triggered by an underlying health issue. These occur once the nerves and blood vessels in the head react with the chemical activity in the brain, resulting to a pounding headache.

Primary headaches include tension headaches, cluster headaches and migraines which are triggered by various triggers linked to the lifestyle of the individual, including lack of sleep, alcohol consumption and even heat. An individual is likely to experience harsh headaches during the warm season and can be experienced more frequently. Many individuals who suffer from chronic headaches were not able to enjoy in outdoor activities due to the changes in the temperature and altitude. Other contributing factors include changes in the diet, exposure to bright sunlight and scented sunscreen.

Headache-heat

Primary headaches include tension headaches, cluster headaches and migraines which are triggered by various triggers linked to the lifestyle of the individual, including lack of sleep, alcohol consumption and even heat.

Heat-related conditions

Heat exhaustion

Headaches are a distinctive indication of heat exhaustion which is triggered by exposure to warm temperature, overexertion and high humidity. Aside from the pounding headache, other symptoms include rapid pulse rate, muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting, cool skin and fatigue. When an individual is overheated, there is not enough sweat produced to keep the body temperature cool. If an individual is suspected with heat exhaustion, the activity should be stopped and transfer him/her to a shaded area and provide water to drink.

Heat stroke

A headache can also indicate a heat stroke which is the most dangerous heat-related condition. This develops once the body could no longer cool itself naturally. The body temperature can rise up to 106 degrees F or higher in just a few minutes. Other symptoms include hot and dry skin, dizziness, rapid pulse, nausea, vomiting and loss of consciousness.

What you can do

If an individual experiences headache while outside and the temperature is high, transfer him/her to a shaded area that is cool. Position him/her on his/her back with the legs elevated higher than the heart. Provide water or sports drink to the individual to restore the bodily fluids.

When to call for help

In case the headache is linked to heat stroke, it requires medical care right away. While waiting for the medical team to arrive, you have to sponge the individual with water or cover in a wet sheet. Make sure that the body temperature drops between 101-102 degrees F or until the medical team arrives on the scene.

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