Middle ear tumors

The development of middle ear tumors usually occurs in the region at the rear part the eardrum that can be non-malignant or cancerous. The middle ear has a vital role in the hearing capability of the ears. It is responsible for transmitting signals into neural signals. Just remember though that even the benign tumors are capable of causing damage to the structure of the middle ear and disrupt with normal hearing.

What are the types?

The benign middle ear tumors are known to occur more often than the cancerous tumors in the middle ear. The most prevalent type of tumor in the ear or cholesteatoma is a benign type. The glomus tumors are also benign tumors that can metastasize and grow large in size, often growing into the mastoid bone.

The facial nerve neuromas often arise in the facial nerves which are uncommon and benign but capable of causing significant symptoms. Cholesterol granulomas and polyps can also grow in the middle ear.

Middle ear tumors

The cholesteatomas can cause loss of hearing but can also lead to drainage and even the possibility for paralysis of the face or vertigo if the tumor corrodes through the bony canal.

The cancerous tumors of the middle ear include squamous cell carcinoma which occurs among individuals who have chronic ear or mastoid bone infection as well as drainage.

Possible causes

The middle ear tumors do not have a single case. Various types of tumors grow from different structures. The cholesteatomas often develop after a ruptured eardrum or from chronic inflammation in the middle ear.

The congenital cholesteatomas can also develop from the leftovers of embryonic tissue. The cholesterol granulomas often develop after hemorrhage or bleeding in the middle ear.

Signs and symptoms

The symptoms from middle ear tumors tend to vary depending on the type of tumor. The cholesteatomas can cause loss of hearing but can also lead to drainage and even the possibility for paralysis of the face or vertigo if the tumor corrodes through the bony canal.

The glomus tumors can also cause pulsatile tinnitus which is a pulsating sound that is heard in the ear on the side of the tumor as well as hearing loss. The facial nerve neuromas can also lead to facial paralysis. As for the squamous cell tumors, they can cause drainage, pain, bleeding and evident hearing loss.

Management of middle ear tumors

In most cases, surgery is often required to remove most types of middle ear tumors. In some cases, radiation therapy is often utilized after the removal of the cancerous tumor.

Possible complications

Any form of surgery on the middle ear can disrupt with the ability of the individual to taste due to potential damage to a nerve that travels via the middle ear up to the front part of the tongue. If there is injury to the facial nerve, it can aggravate middle ear surgery. Extensive procedures on the removal of the tumor can result to full hearing loss and balance issues.

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