Posterior ankle impingement

Posterior ankle impingement is defined by tissue damage at the rear part of the ankle joint due to the compression of the tissues during full plantar flexion of the joint.

If the foot and ankle are tipped far away from the body, the ankle is crushed at the rear part of the joint. This results to pain and tissue damage if the force is repeated or forceful.

What are the causes?

Posterior ankle impingement is likely to occur among ballet dancers, gymnasts and those who play football.

It also occurs due to poor rehabilitation of an acute ankle injury. Oftentimes, those who have anatomical irregularities in the talus bone might be at higher risk for developing the condition.

Posterior ankle impingement

An individual with posterior ankle impingement generally suffers from ankle pain during activities that involves maximal plantarflexion or after activity with rest.

What are the indications of posterior ankle impingement?

An individual with posterior ankle impingement generally suffers from ankle pain during activities that involves maximal plantarflexion or after activity with rest.

The usual activities that trigger the condition include:

  • Kicking
  • Swimming
  • Hopping or jumping
  • Kneeling
  • Dancing

The symptoms are typically experienced in the rear part of the ankle or Achilles region and might manifest as a dull sensation or an acute piercing pain. The signs might intensify if firmly pressing on the rear part of the ankle joint and might be referred occasionally into other parts such as the foot or calf.

More Information / Disclaimer

The information posted on this page on posterior ankle impingement is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the signs and how it is treated by taking a standard first aid course with Vancouver First Aid.

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