Ruptured Baker’s cyst

A Baker’s cyst or popliteal cyst is filled with fluid on the rear part of the knee. It might protrude which causes a sensation of tightness that becomes uncomfortable if the knee is extended or flexed.

The condition is often brought about by an issue with the knee joint such as gout, arthritis or knee injury where the joint produces excess fluid.

What happens if I have a ruptured Baker’s cyst?

It is important to note that a Baker’s cyst might rupture. Once this occurs, the fluid within the cyst leaks into the calf which turns reddened and swollen.

If the cyst ruptures, it is likely to result to a piercing calf pain along with a sensation that is the same as water flowing down the rear part of the leg. In addition, there is also a bruise on the interior ankle.

Ruptured Baker’s cyst

If the cyst ruptures, it is likely to result to a piercing calf pain along with a sensation that is the same as water flowing down the rear part of the leg.

Management

The doctor will also suggest keeping the calf in a raised position. An ice pack should also be applied on the rear part of the joint. Some doctors might also prescribe pain medications, but the over-the-counter variants are usually enough.

In most instances, it might take a few weeks until the fluid is reabsorbed into the body.

When to consult a doctor

If the individual has Baker’s cyst that does not settle on its own, a doctor should be consulted. After a physical exam, the doctor will decide to drain the cyst. The doctor will also deal with the underlying condition responsible for the cyst.

In case there is a protrusion behind the knee, it might be Baker’s cyst. In case the pain and swelling behind the knee results to a reddened, swollen calf, it might be a sign of a ruptured Baker’s cyst.

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