Thigh splints: Ideal treatment options

Thigh splints causes discomfort in the middle part of the femur where the abductor muscles link the bones. It is important to note that the femur is a large-sized bone that links to the hip. The condition is prevalent among individuals who run and those who engage in high-impact sports.

Ideal treatment options for thigh splints

The treatment for thigh splints generally involves rest and a variety of treatment options.

Splinting

thigh-splints

The splint used can be made of a padded brace with Velcro ties that is wrapped around the leg for easy removal when bathing and adjusted in case of swelling.

Different forms of splints or braces can be utilized to stabilize the leg to promote healing as well as lessen the pain of thigh splints.

If there are no damage to the ankle, a tubular-shaped splint can be used over the thigh and knee to secure the femur in place.

The splint used can be made of a padded brace with Velcro ties that is wrapped around the leg for easy removal when bathing and adjusted in case of swelling.

Substitution

Even though thigh splints can be managed with adequate rest and application of ice on the sore areas, complete immobility is not advised since it could lead to atrophy of the neighboring muscles as well as rigidity and loss of cardiovascular endurance.

The individual is encouraged to swap other activities that do not add any weight on the affected leg. Physical activities such as cycling and swimming are ideal non-weight bearing exercises to engage in while healing. The individual should steadily return to the sport responsible for the injury in the first place.

Cast

A cast might be necessary if the bone has been displaced. The casts that are filled with air are ideal for thigh fractures since they can be adjusted as the swelling settles.

The cast also allows the individual to continue with exercise as the bone heals. The casts are generally worn for 6-8 weeks.

Surgery

Surgery might be the most effective treatment for severe cases of fractures that include the hip or knee joint.

Professional athletes usually respond best to surgery involving the implantation of rods or nails in the femur to prevent fractures in the future. A rehabilitation period generally follows surgery.

More Information / Disclaimer

The information posted on this page on thigh splints is for learning purposes only. Learn to properly manage the injury by taking a standard first aid course with Vancouver First Aid.

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