What is peroneal tendinosis?

Peroneal tendinosis involves the enlargement and thickening along with swelling of the peroneal tendons. The condition typically occurs due to overuse especially when engaging in repetitive activity that irritate the tendon for extended periods of time. The peroneal tendons travel on the exterior of the ankle behind the fibula.

What are the indications?

Individuals with peroneal tendinosis might have tried a new exercise routine or significantly increase their activities.

Generally, there is pain or discomfort at the back part of the ankle. In most cases, there is no history of a specific injury.

What are the causes?

peroneal-tendinosis

Generally, there is pain or discomfort at the back part of the ankle. In most cases, there is no history of a specific injury.

Incorrect training or rapid increase in training and using inappropriate footwear can lead to the condition.

Those who have hindfoot varus posture is also a possible factor for the development of peroneal tendinosis. The reason for this is that the heel is slightly curved inwardly which entails the peroneal tendons to work harder.

Management of peroneal tendinosis

Generally, peroneal tendinosis settles without requiring surgery. As an overuse injury, it can heal with adequate rest.

In case there is intense pain, a walking boot should be worn for several weeks. In case there is no tenderness while walking, an ankle brace might beneficial. The individual should limit the time spent on walking or while on his/her feet until the pain settles. Take note that this typically takes several weeks.

Surgery might be recommended if the pain does not settle with rest. The conservative treatment is usually ongoing even up to a year before surgery is considered.

Length of recovery

An individual usually recovers completely but this takes a long time. The tendon should be allowed to heal before returning to activity. If surgery is suggested, the recovery time might be extended. In such cases, the individual is instructed to avoid placing any weight on the foot for up to 6 weeks.

It is important to note that the outcome is generally good. Nevertheless, it might take time for the individual to resume activity. Once a tear forms and there is long-lasting solidifying of the tendon, the outcome might not be desirable.

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